Blog about blogpost and add a URL, started as a comment on FB #cck11

My  question on FB about adding a UR:  “When commenting on a blog would it be nice when you add your own blog adress? Would it not be nice to try to make a connection by adding the URL of your blog?” .

The members of facebook group cck11 wrote unexpected answers to this request on FB. The answers made me think about the function of a weblog. Has connectivism a view on the function of a blog? The main principle of connectivism is the contact in a network. A blog can be a way to maintain contacts in the network.

Connectivism stressess the use of connections, connections are essential to learning.
Keeping a diary  to write your thoughts is a means of structuring and revising your thoughts without interference of other people. No one will read the diary, and no one will see mistakes and wrong ideas. Publishing your diary on the internet is different, on internet everybody can read your thoughts.  Publishing a blogpost just in order to write down your thoughts is a strange way of publishing. Publishing always presupposes a public. And public is not only a listening ear. Public will write, think and comment. Why publish and not expect an answer?

An answer of a member of FB to my request is: “I see blogs as an odd form of communication. Declaritive responsive Rather Than responsive They Seem out of place in a participative class.” Using a blog as if no one reads it is a pity. The blog is a possibility to link and to make connections. Declarative communication is is not connective communication.
A discussion on the content of a blogpost could enhance the results of publishing the post. Publishing your thoughts and receiving comments on it could be a learning moment.

Just using the blog as a newsletter is OK, but when you make a comment in a blog, or write to the editor of a newspaper, make a better  connections to the network by adding an address, a URL . Better connections gives better learning.

2 thoughts on “Blog about blogpost and add a URL, started as a comment on FB #cck11

  1. I agree with the questions you’re asking. It seems to me that there might be some way to create connections between blog posts, so that one’s response to a blog is integrated more into one’s own blog.

    I feel like I’m just writing and “declaring” most times. But then someone comes along and just says “hi” and that helps.

    Best,
    Leah

  2. I disagree with some of the FB comments.
    A blog can be used as part of a conversation. I follow a few blogs, including a couple of political blogs, and there is always some fairly lively discussion going on.
    When it comes to discussing more rigorously academic content I don’t see much of an alternative. Twitter is too short, plus the same arguments could be made against it, ie. tweeting into the echochamber etc
    Also, I quite like the fact that the discussion is asynchronous – when it comes to complex ideas, and critical thinking one needs both time and space to meaningfully reflect and voice both an opinion or a measured response to someone else’s thinking.

    If particpants want to use blogs in a particatory way there is nothing to stop them.

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