How to evoke more comments on your #change11 blogposts

It is not easy to remain motivated for writing a blog when nobody comments. Why do some blogs get commented and why yours not?
In a Mooc most people only read and lurk (of 1600 persons some 50 did engage in publishing in Plenk Mooc.
It is like dating you must invest some time and effort to date your readers and to seduce her/him to comment. Why is blogging so important? (Stephen Wheeler)
* Ask questions in your blog. Just stating a fact or an opinion does not invite responses or comments. If you would like somebody to comment on your blog, ask questions.
* Be personal. Share something personal, because people like to connect to a human being. Do share a problem, because people like to help and write solutions.
* Try something creative, try to make people think ‘Wow, awesome” Some people will want to share this feeling and comment. I do like lúcidaTranslúcida’s choice of pictures
* Do not post your blogpost at once. Save the draft and read it after an hour and make it better. Quality will make people comment.
* Put different arguments in your post, and wait for the discussion to evolve. End the post with “I would like to read your comment on this”. Paul Prinsloo does do this.
* Link in your blog to other bloggers. Most blogs do automatically message this to the owner of the blog.
* Do comment yourself on blogs of other people, and leave a URL of your own blog. Make your blog known. Cry out on Facebook Twitter that you did write a post and would love comments.
* Think of a fascinating tittle for the blogpost.

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24 thoughts on “How to evoke more comments on your #change11 blogposts

  1. Jaap – thanks for practising what you preach 🙂

    You are right – writing a blog is quite a scary exercise. I am a second language English speaker myself (my home language is Afrikaans) and I always feel self-conscious blogging in a language (and grammar…) that is not my own! And yes, there is nothing quite as satisfying as to get a notification that someone has actually commented on one’s blog. If no one responds, it feels like the ZEN saying: “The sound of one hand clapping”.

    Thanks for sharing!

  2. Your thoughtful suggestions for written engagement are succinct and helpful … thank you. Motivation is a difficult prospect for many readers, as it is akin to going bare naked in the scheme of prose. It is a risk that many are unwilling to take … might this be one of the areas of “education” that needs more support for the learner throughout life?

  3. Carol, thank you. (did not know “succinct” looked it up, is an interesting word)
    This risk to be seen bare naked and yet be willing to publish that is living on the edge.
    I know education can be a help. Practice and to get used to be seen will help people to be more open to experience.
    If adult people do need external motivation and cannot find it, what is wrong with them? Being an adult means to be responsible for your motivation, I thought. They will avoid the exciting things in life that make it worth living. So education is needed very much.
    regards Jaap

  4. Great summary, Jaap, thank you! I like the idea of drafting and coming back later (which is really easy in WordPress). Carol, I think you’re on to something big hear about risk…
    – risking visibility, privacy or exposure
    – risking vulnerability
    – risking failure
    – risking change

    There is something truly delightful about seeing a new comment on my blog and something that makes me take pause when i don’t see any comments at all. The pause is good though, it helps me look deeper at my own needs for feedback, validation, confirmation, etc.

  5. Brainy, You could be right. Fear and angst could be the hidden cause of people not fully enjoying the MOOC by publishing and commenting.
    How does one help students online to overcome fear and angst of visibility, exposure, vulnerability etc. ?
    Maybe this is the key to better MOOC’s!

  6. Great post. Really likethe idea of writesomething personal. This approach resonates with me as it helps make the writers more knowable. To me it is a more personal approach that invites response.

  7. Have been immersed in ur blog posts for s few weeks. They are really expanding mooc experience. Also ur tweets about the reduction in freedoms in ur country. U are stirring thought – shame you can’t hear that!!!

  8. Very informative post I thing blogging is right way to connect with peoples. Writing valuable article on site definitely improve site performance. Sharing thought with peoples through blog is great idea which helps the blogger to point out their weaken point and link blog to another blogger site definitely increase your blog popularity and discussion between blogger and commenter will build trust and strong relationship between both of them through online conversation.

  9. LOL!

    hi, thanks..

    I think about motivation and you like the pictures…. ahahah!
    I think everyday about the title …. the title maybe is the motivation for all!

  10. To adhere to connectivist principals maybe it should be compulsory to reply to a blog for every blog you write? Blogging is a strange kind of fish in the world of human interaction. I avoid engaging with people who are talking to themselves on the street because I sense the words are private, loaded with internal meanings and not meant for me. Maybe not posting in MOOCs or blogging is a residual effect of being told not to talk to ourselves in public? Though given the number of people who talk away without a care in the world on their cell phones in public, few people were listening when the no talking in public lesson was presented.

    Another possibility is we are into a new era of interaction with blogging being an underdeveloped form of conversation? Drive a little way out of town where I live and you can listen to the coyotes howling in the evening. Since their calls are inappropriately loud for their nearby buddies these howl sessions are a form of shouting into the wilderness to determine something a canine would find interesting. These call sessions also project a sense of joy or celebration and perhaps blogging is a form of uncontainable delight like being a coyote on such a fine night that it has to be told to everyone?

    As for lurking, it should be pointed out that more people responded to the survey of lurkers (that Rita reported on) than to the survey of participants. So clearly, lurking isn’t entirely based on the urge to go unnoticed. There are many reasons why people don’t declare themselves. Even the most outgoing dog doesn’t pee on every tree.

    Great post!!!

    Scott

  11. Ode on comments

    Oh the joy of reading your comments
    Jolly good of you
    I feel an urge to go outside and howl
    like a coyote in the land of Scott,
    just for fun
    If i were a poet
    I did write a poem, an ode on comments.

    Learning really is a social thing, not reading posts,
    but writing comments is the secret of learning.
    In reading a blogpost with the intention of
    writing a comment
    one does learn so much
    And thinking about what to write
    is the very peak of learning.

  12. Hi Jaap – I have thought about this often and have come to the conclusion that it’s all a bit of a game (hope this isn’t too cycnical).

    Of course we all like to receive comments on our posts as they give us some recognition for our efforts, but as you say, it is possible to follow a formula and manipulate this to increase the number of comments we receive.

    I first became aware of this on Flickr when initially I wondered why my photos on my site rarely receive comments, whereas other people’s photos which I honestly didn’t think were any better than mine received lots. Then I realised that if you join groups and comment a lot on other people’s photos, they return the favour. The more you do this, the more comments you can get. But I didn’t and don’t want comments on my photos for the sake of the number of comments and it’s embarrassing to receive comments on a photo that I know isn’t a good photo. My photos, like my blog posts, are not aimed at receiving comments, but as an outlet for my own self-expression. If I am feeling lonely, I will ‘play the game’, but I am usually equally happy to ‘talk to myself’ 🙂

  13. hi Scott,Jaap and J.Mackness
    Very good this “Blogging is a strange kind of fish in the world of human interaction. I avoid engaging with people who are talking to themselves on the street because I sense the words are private, loaded with internal meanings and not meant for me. ”

    and about ” But I didn’t and don’t want comments on my photos for the sake of the number of comments and it’s embarrassing to receive comments on a photo that I know isn’t a good photo. ” Jenny , I don’t have this problem because photos are photos only.

    And Irene now is happy!!!!

  14. Thanks Japp at al. I want to connect with others to refine my thinking and seek comments because thinking alone is pretty limiting. Your suggestions are helpful and I appreciate that you put them out there.

  15. Jeffry you are always with an audience. You are an important part of it, but internet is open and unexpected audiences are watching us.
    When I try to write for an audience, my thinking and language improves.
    Ars vivendi convert unpleasantness to joy
    Haap

  16. Jeffry you are always with an audience. You are an important part of it, but internet is open and unexpected audiences are watching us.
    When I try to write for an audience, my thinking and language improves.
    Ars vivendi convert unpleasantness to joy
    Haap

  17. The following quote seems like it would fit in here. From a researcher who puts jazz musicians in MRI machines and studies their brains. Looks like the part of the brain that increases creativity is also the part that specializes in self-reference and self-expression. So while those who blog may seem to blathering away for the greater glory of themselves, in actual fact they are increasing the amount of creative potential. As opposed to schools that are all about self-discipline, censoring what you say and excessive restraint. So the next time someone says, “So you think it’s all about you, do you?” You can say, “Why yes, in fact, it IS all about me!”

    >He found that when the musicians in the scanner were asked to stop playing memorized music >and improvise, “The [activity in the] medial prefrontal area went up—that’s this autobiographical, >self-referential, self-expressive area. And the lateral prefrontal regions went down—those are >self-inhibitory, self-censoring, self-monitoring regions of the brain….The way we interpreted >it—and this is with a lot of caveats—is that this might be one of the neural signatures of >spontaneous creativity.”

    http://www.utne.com/Science-and-Technology/Creativity-on-the-Brain.aspx#ixzz1fXocjn5F

  18. Hi Scott very interesting link, as I happen to be a musician myself. Blathering away is what we do and now we discover we are creative 😉 Life is a balance between these two modes, self-inhibition and self-expressive.

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