Reading on Deleuze and rhizomes and education #change11

Reductionism and education do not fit very well together.
Think of a child labeled ADHD, this is a reductionist way of describing a child. Ignoring all kinds of stories that also could be told about this child, and focussing on this one label. Could reductionism overcome this by adding more labels?
Galileo’s Grandmother  is  dichotomizing into communities and non-communities, groups, nets, etc. This could be a smart tool to do research, but  when dichotomizing you are loosing a lot of meaningful traits of these different forms.  Is dichotomizing  a  research tool not fit for looking at education?
Great educational ‘theories’ which never are working in school practice, are  fruit of the reductionist research in eduction.  The reductionist approach uses traits and features and qualities to classify and indicate a thing or person.  Reductionist research is looking for similarities. Is looking for similarities useful in  education and educational research? What is educational technology a real technology or a collection of rules of thumb?
The rhizome approach uses history and processes to indicate the becoming of a thing or person. Difference is a key word.  The rhizome approach will change education in an art, with artisans and crafts. The teacher is not a person applying scientific theories in school to students. Should  teachers become  artists, contributing to a narrative, a life story, or  conducting a piece of music.
Learning narrative in Tai’s blog as an instrument to assess prior (emergent; non-formal) learning fits in the rhizome approach of learning.
Was Rousseau a rhizomatic educational researcher when he did his experiments (virtual) on education in his ‘Emile ou de l’éducation”?

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