changing small group Roles into rhizoroles #rhizo15

Group ActivityBenne and Sheats (1948) identified three broad types of roles people play in small groups: task roles, building and maintenance roles, and self-centered roles.
I play with these roles to think about rules and roles in rhizomatic learning.
Group culture (even rhizomatic group culture?) needs facilitating and guiding, but who will do that if the teacher (as a dominant group role) is not in the course? Maybe we could co-faciltate each other with sufficient openness to difference? (question of Frances Bell in a tweet) Is this co-facilitating really possible or is it the ‘fundamental cognitive error

Task Roles: Focus is on completing group’s goal

Coordinator: Relates statements made
by one group member
to another group member

Energizer: Stimulates group
to take action

Elaborator:
Expands upon
another’s ideas

Evaluator-critic:
Assesses the group’s
work by higher standards

Information-giver:
Provides helpful
information

Information-seeker:
Asks for
clarification

Recorder: Keep notes (minutes)
about a meeting

Procedural Technician:
Takes
responsibility
for tasks

Group-Building/Maintenance Roles
Focus is on building interpersonal relationships, maintaining harmony

Encourager:
Provides
positive feedback

Follower:
Accepts ideas of others in group

Compromiser:
Attempts to reach a solution everyone finds acceptable

Gatekeeper:
Facilitates participation
from everyone in group

Harmonizer:
Reduces conflict and tension
(often through humor)

Observer:
Evaluates
group progress

Aggressor:
Acts antagonistic
towards
other group members
and their ideas

Dominator:
Monopolizes group
speaking time

Blocker:
Refuses to cooperate with other’s ideas

Help-Seeker:
Acts helpless to avoid work

Loafer:
Avoids work

Special Interest Advocate:
Presents own viewpoint
and needs

Self-confessor: Discusses topics only of importance to self and not the group

Coordinator: Relates statements made by a group member to another statement from outside the group.

Energizer: Stimulates group to bring activity from outside into the group.

Elaborator: Expands upon another’s ideas and relates to ideas found outside the group.

Evaluator-critic: Assesses the group’s work by higher standards compares with the outside world.

Information-giver: Provides helpful information from outside the course, the group.

Information-seeker: Asks for clarification, and for connection to other sources of information.

Recorder: Keep notes about meeting and blogs about that.

Procedural Technician: Takes responsibility for tasks and asks members to connect to the outside world.

Group-Building/Maintenance Roles
Focus is on building interpersonal relationships, maintaining harmony

Encourager: Provides positive feedback if new connections are made

Follower: Accepts ideas of others and of new persons in the group

Compromiser: Attempts to discuss broadly when inside and outside views do cause disruption

Gatekeeper: Facilitates participation from everyone in group and from outsiders

Harmonizer: Reduces conflict and tension (often through humor) and looks for inspiration outside.

Observer: Evaluates group progress and has special care for openness and connectivity to outside.

Aggressor: Acts antagonistic and disruptive towards other group members and their ideas by introducing outside voices and ideas.

Dominator: Monopolizes group speaking time and tries to close the group for outsiders.

Blocker: Refuses to cooperate with other’s ideas if these are closing the group from outside.

Help-Seeker: Acts helpless to make the group open and rhizomatic

Loafer: Avoids work, and refuses looking outside the inner circle.

Special Interest Advocate: Presents own viewpoint and needs, and does not help to keep an open group

Self-confessor: Discusses topics only of importance to self and not the group

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One thought on “changing small group Roles into rhizoroles #rhizo15

  1. […] About grading and power: https://connectiv.wordpress.com/2014/01/31/power-and-education/ Humans do learn, humans are always learning. Learning may occur consciously or without conscious awareness. https://connectiv.wordpress.com/2014/02/18/the-end-of-the-rhizome-2/ It seems rather impossible to assess this learning without being aware of what we learn. Do we need goals to learn? https://connectiv.wordpress.com/2014/04/21/vive-la-difference/ “What can we get done with subjectives that can’t be done with objectives? ” is what do we teach and give our students above the knowledge and skills they must learn as prescribed by the curruculum. How do we influence the becoming of our students, the kind of humans they will be.https://connectiv.wordpress.com/2015/04/16/rhizo15-subjective-perspective-on-teaching-for-life/ What if schools did try to discover possibilities and potency in students? (count your blessings?) What if schools tried to develop these possibilities in stead of working with curricula and standard tests? https://connectiv.wordpress.com/2015/04/27/order-in-the-classroom-moral-questions-in-rhizo15/ About group roles. Do DS106 learn to be better group members? https://connectiv.wordpress.com/2015/05/18/changing-small-group-roles-into-rhizoroles-rhizo15/ […]

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